What I like About Me! By Allia Zobel Nola and Miki Yamamoto
What I like About Me! By Allia Zobel Nola and Miki Yamamoto

What I like About Me! By Allia Zobel Nola and Miki Yamamoto

This fun-loving book shows kids that, in a world where fitting in is the norm, being different makes us special.

The Art of Body Acceptance: Strengthen Your Relationship with Yourself Through Therapeutic Creative Exercises By Ashlee Bennett
The Art of Body Acceptance: Strengthen Your Relationship with Yourself Through Therapeutic Creative Exercises By Ashlee Bennett

The Art of Body Acceptance: Strengthen Your Relationship with Yourself Through Therapeutic Creative Exercises By Ashlee Bennett

Ashlee Bennett will teach you how to reclaim your creativity and make amends with your body using art.

Bodies are Cool By Tyler Feder
Bodies are Cool By Tyler Feder

Bodies are Cool By Tyler Feder

This picture book is a pure celebration of all the different human bodies that exist in the world. Highlighting the various skin tones, body shapes, and hair types is just the beginning in this truly inclusive book.

Raising Body Positive Teens: A Parent's Guide to Diet-Free Living, Exercise and Body Image By Signe Darpinian, Wendy Sterling, Shelley Aggarwal
Raising Body Positive Teens: A Parent's Guide to Diet-Free Living, Exercise and Body Image By Signe Darpinian, Wendy Sterling, Shelley Aggarwal

Raising Body Positive Teens: A Parent’s Guide to Diet-Free Living, Exercise and Body Image By Signe Darpinian, Wendy Sterling, Shelley Aggarwal

In a world fraught with diet-culture and weight stigma, many parents worry about their child’s relationship with their body and food. This down-to-earth guide is an invaluable resource allowing parents to take proactive actions in promoting a friendship with food, and preventative actions to minimize the risk factors for the development of eating disorders.

Love Your Body By Jessica Sanders

Love Your Body introduces the language of self-love and self-care to help build resilience, while representing and celebrating diverse bodies, encouraging you to appreciate your uniqueness.

Reclaiming Body Trust: A Path to Healing & Liberation
Reclaiming Body Trust: A Path to Healing & Liberation

Reclaiming Body Trust: A Path to Healing & Liberation

Informed by the personal body stories of the hundreds of people they have worked with, Reclaiming Body Trust delineates an intersectional, social justice?orientated path to healing in three phases: The Rupture, The Reckoning, and The Reclamation. Throughout, readers will be anchored by the authors’ innovative and revolutionary Body Trust framework to discover a pathway out of a rigid, mechanistic way of thinking about the body and into a more authentic, sustainable way to occupy and nurture our bodies.

Landwhale By Jes Baker
Landwhale By Jes Baker

Landwhale By Jes Baker

By the author of Things No One Will Tell Fat Girls and a heroine of the body image movement, an intimate, gutsy memoir about being a fat woman. A deeply personal take, Landwhale is a glimpse at life as a fat woman today, but it’s also a reflection of the unforgiving ways our culture still treats fatness.

Fat Talk by Virginia Sole-Smith
Fat Talk by Virginia Sole-Smith

Fat Talk by Virginia Sole-Smith

Fat Talk is a stirring, deeply researched, and groundbreaking book that will help parents learn to reckon with their own body biases, identify diet culture, and empower their kids to navigate this challenging landscape. Sole-Smith draws on her extensive reporting and interviews with dozens of parents and kids to offer a provocative new approach for thinking about food and bodies, and a way for us all to work toward a more weight-inclusive world.

"You Just Need to Lose Weight": And 19 Other Myths About Fat People By Aubrey Gordon
"You Just Need to Lose Weight": And 19 Other Myths About Fat People By Aubrey Gordon

You Just Need to Lose Weight: And 19 Other Myths About Fat People By Aubrey Gordon

The co-host of the Maintenance Phase podcast and creator of Your Fat Friend equips you with the facts to debunk common anti-fat myths and with tools to take action for fat justice

What We Don't Talk About When We Talk About Fat by Aubrey Gordon
What We Don't Talk About When We Talk About Fat by Aubrey Gordon

What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About Fat by Aubrey Gordon

Anti-fatness is everywhere. In What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About Fat, Aubrey Gordon unearths the cultural attitudes and social systems that have led to people being denied basic needs because they are fat and calls for social justice movements to be inclusive of plus-sized people’s experiences. Unlike the recent wave of memoirs and quasi self-help books that encourage readers to love and accept themselves, Gordon pushes the discussion further towards authentic fat activism, which includes ending legal weight discrimination, giving equal access to health care for large people, increased access to public spaces, and ending anti-fat violence. As she argues, “I did not come to body positivity for self-esteem. I came to it for social justice.”

meganjaynecrabbe

Megan Jayne Crabbe (she/her) is best known for changing the narrative of how women feel about their bodies. She is the author of Body Positive Power.

yrfatfriend

Aubrey Gordon (she/her) is an author, columnist, and cohost of Maintenance Phase. Her work has been published in The New York Times, Vox, Literary Hub, SELF, Health, Glamour and more. Her first book, What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About Fat was released in November 2020. Her second book, “You Just Need to Lose Weight” and 19 Other Myths About Fat People, is a New York Times and Indie bestseller.

your_body_is_good

Amanda Martinez Beck (she/her) is a fat activist, body image coach, & author of More of You: The Fat Girl’s Field Guide to the Modern World

v_solesmith

Virginia Sole-Smith (she/her) writes about diet culture, anti-fat bias, feminism and health. She is a journalist whose latest book is, Fat Talk: Parenting in the Age of Diet Culture

theshirarose

Shira Rose (she/her) is an eating disorder therapist, LCSW who operates from a fat positive + Health At Every Size framework

thefriendIneverwanted

Nia Patterson (they/them) is a queer, fat body Liberation Coach, consultant, writer, speaker, activist, and author

thefatdoctor

Dr. Asher Larmie is a fat doctor campaigning for an end to medical weight stigma so that everyone can access fair and equal healthcare irrespective of the number on the scales.

resilientfatgoddex

SJ (they/them) is a Coach, Consultant, And Soon To Be Social Worker Focused On Fat Liberation Based In Anti-Racism And Anti-Colonialism.

ragenchastain

Ragen Chastain (she/her) is a Speaker, Writer, Researcher, Board Certified Patient Advocate, ACE Certified Health Coach and Functional Fitness Specialist. She primarily writes about the intersections of weight science, weight stigma, health and healthcare at the WeightAndHealthcare substack

queer.art_therapist

Wednesdae Reim Ifrach (They/Them) REAT, ATR-BC, ATCS, LPC, NCC, CLAT, LCMHC, LPCC is Fat, Trans/Non-Binary, Queer, Disabled. They hold a master’s degree in art therapy and their specialities include Their current specialties include gender affirming care, fat and body activism, intersectional social justice, complex trauma and eating disorder treatment.

newmoonrd

Meghan McGann, RD (she/her) is an anti-diet dietitian who advocates for inclusive care.

nalgonapositivitypride

Non-conventional eating disorder awareness organization run by Gloria Lucas (she/her). Her work focuses on eating disorder harm reduction.

melissadtoler

Melissa Toler (she/her) is a former wellness coach turned writer, speaker, and educator

jessicawilson.msrd

Jessica Wilson, MS, RD (she/her) is a clinical dietitian, consultant and author, whose work focuses on her experiences navigating the dietetic fields as a Black, queer dietitian

heysharonmaxwell

Sharon Maxwell (she/her) is a speaker; weight inclusive consultant; and fat activist

nic.mcdermid

Nic McDermid (she/her) is a fierce activist, feminist, advocate and content creator whose work focuses on disrupting the dominant discourse around weight and bodies, and challenging the ways in which certain types of bodies are both idolised and idealised.

dr.jenniewh

Dr. Jennie Wang-Hall is a liberatory eating disorders psychologist creating community spaces for anti-carceral and agentic care

bodyhonornutrition

Kimmie Singh is a fat and fat-positive dietitian-nutritionist

bodyimage_therapist

Ashlee Bennett, AThR is an art therapist and artist and the author of The Art of Body Acceptance. Her areas of special interest include body image, internalized weight stigma/fat phobia, disordered eating/eating disorders, chronic dieting, and trauma.

bodyimagewithbri

Bri Campos is a body image educator who teaches body acceptance through grief

bodyjusticetherapist

Allyson Inez Ford is an eating disorders and OCD therapist. Social justice is an integral part of her work and she operates from a HAES lens.

bodyliberationwithlindley

Lindley Ashline is a body liberation photographer, writer and activist

decolonizingfitness

Ilya Parker founded Decolonizing Fitness in an effort to help dismantle toxic fitness culture. It is an online resource hub for coaches, gym owners, personal trainers and anyone who is invested in cultivating movement spaces that are more affirming and supportive to diverse bodies.

dietitiananna

Anna Sweeney, MS, RDN, CED-S is a relational nutrition therapist who specializes in eating disorders, disordered eating, and chronic illness

drrachelmillner

Dr. Rachel Millner is a psychologist, Certified Eating Disorder Specialist and Supervisor, and a Certified Body Trust® provider. Her work is trauma-informed, fat-positive, anti-diet and rooted in feminist theory, relational theory, social justice, and body liberation

edadhd_therapist

Stacie Fanelli, LCSW is an AuDHD eating disorder therapist who discusses neurodivergence, EDs, intersectionality & treatment reform

encouragingdietitian

Christyna Johnson, MS, RD, LDN is a non-diet registered dietitian specializing in eating disorder, disordered eating, intuitive eating, and body image. She sees the world through a liberation lens and advocates for collective care to move us forward.

Maintenance Phase

Debunking the junk science behind health fads, wellness scams and nonsensical nutrition advice.

The Association for Size Diversity and Health (ASDAH)

As a non-profit organization with an international membership committed to the practice of the Health At Every Size® (HAES) Principles, ASDAH envisions a world that celebrates bodies of all shapes and sizes, in which body weight is no longer a source of discrimination and where oppressed communities have equal access to the resources and practices that support health and well being.
ASDAH provides ongoing opportunities for development, including educational resources, vetted referral opportunities, and an extensive network of like-minded advocates and professionals.

All Fired Up

Welcome to the All Fired Up podcast, with your host Louise Adams! Louise is by nature a mild mannered clinical psychologist, but her alter ego – a FIERCE and fearless anti-diet crusader – is taking over! Louise specialises in helping people recover from disordered eating, and she’s COMPLETELY OVER trying to help people when the culture we live in is utterly sick, toxic, and screwed up when it comes to food, exercise, health, and body size. Louise cannot for a second longer take the rampant injustice of a society obsessed with thinness and health. She can’t STAND how fat people are being treated like second class citizens. She is LIVID about the way weight science is being sold to make a buck off human misery. And she’s SO OVER the diet bulls**t that she’s shelved her own introversion and started a podcast! So welcome to All Fired Up!, where Louise delves deeply into diet culture and blows it the hell up! Each week we’ll meet brave and fascinating anti-diet warriors who are also fighting for equality, justice, and freedom. Join us, and get All Fired Up! about building a better world!

The Body Grievers Club

Brianna Campos is changing the cultural conversation from diets and rules to acceptance and freedom. This is a podcast that explores the ins and outs of body image, self-esteem, diet culture, self-love, and finding peace as you come home to your body.

Burnt Toast

Virginia Sole-Smith engages guests in conversations about how we dismantle diet culture and fatphobia, especially through parenting, health and fashion

Taking Focus Away from Diet Culture

Taking Focus Away from Diet Culture

By Victoria Kupiec RD, LDN, Director of Nutrition Services, Timberline Knolls

Diet culture is a prominent part of society that is often difficult to avoid. Conversations surrounding diet are ever-present on social media, in stores, and on television. This diet culture places a strong emphasis on achieving the ideal level of thinness with the promise of love, acceptance, and health to follow.

We are often told that we will suffer from disease and feelings of worthlessness if we fail to achieve an appropriate weight. Blame and ever-changing body standards that transform with time serve as major barriers to sustaining well-being.

The focus on unrealistic body standards promotes a cycle of shame that further attracts individuals to diet culture and products with the intention of “fixing” their bodies. Yet, the majority of diets that are started with the intention of weight loss are unsuccessful in the long term. Individuals often feel shamed or guilty if they are unable to meet the goals they set for themselves. If someone does not experience or sustain the weight loss they desire, they may adopt the belief that they are weak and do not possess enough willpower to manage their weight.

The overwhelming number of individuals whose dieting is unsuccessful points toward a big-picture issue with approaches rather than a problem with the individual. Another aspect that impacts the effectiveness of dieting tools is their heavy reliance on external cues and strategies. A more effective approach to support a positive relationship with food should instead focus on building sustainable habits that are not rooted in restriction and that help rebuild the body’s own innate wisdom to guide one’s eating.

Individuals who begin dieting will often regain the weight shortly after, which triggers the continuation of the dieting cycle. This cycle and the associated negative feelings leave our bodies and minds exhausted. Over time, this fatigue takes a toll on our emotional and physical well-being. The adverse effects of dieting can be seen with every fad diet that emerges, yet it is common place to fault the individuals rather than the approaches.

One solution to this struggle is to allow ourselves an open-minded approach to discover how we interact with food. Individuals are encouraged to develop and honor internal cues of hunger and fullness while exploring how different foods affect their bodies. This would also involve permission to incorporate foods for enjoyment. By allowing ourselves to explore the tastes, smells, and textures of food through an unbiased lens, we can find a balanced, yet diverse connection with what we eat.

These methods of self-inquiry are important, especially when supplemented by education from healthcare professionals who are trained in nutrition. There is no single solution to achieve a body image that you are comfortable with. Because each individual, and their relationship with food and eating, is unique, it is important to emphasize the body as a complex and multifaceted system that must be nurtured and cared for. In this way, our society can begin to see the importance of a person’s well-being, rather than focusing solely on their weight.

Fatphobia is probably something you’ve heard about but didn’t have a name for.

Fatphobia is probably something you’ve heard about but didn’t have a name for.
Written by Meagan Mullen, Clinician and Community Outreach Specialist

It is no secret that our society can be judgmental, competitive, and appearance-obsessed. So it’s no surprise that people in bigger bodies can be treated poorly. Most people are probably aware of the fact that being in a bigger body comes with a certain stigma, and having negative attitudes or thoughts about these people is called fatphobia. Similarly, weight stigma is stereotyping people based on their weight.

These types of thoughts and beliefs can often lead to chronic dieting, disordered eating, or full blown eating disorders!

There have been plenty of articles (here and here) that highlight the dangers of fatphobia (and weight stigma!) and showcase how present it is in our society, but what do we do to work against this type of discrimination and unhealthy belief?

There are a few steps we can take to address this issue, and they might be easier to achieve than you think.

1. Recognize your own bias.

Just like with any type of discrimination or unfair treatment, it’s important to be aware of our own biases. It can be hard to live in a society with such apparent judgments on appearance and not catch ourselves slipping up. In a way, we’ve been taught to think certain things that we hear from others, from the media, or even from parents, friends, and family. That being said, acknowledging our own biases is the first step in changing our thought patterns and beliefs.

2. Challenge fatphobic thoughts you have or words you use.

When you catch yourself saying things that might have a negative connotation in relation to someone’s weight or size, STOP! Be patient and kind to yourself as you work against these beliefs that have been ingrained in so many of us. Try using language that is more neutral like “bigger-bodied,” or just drop the body descriptors all together!

3. Read up/learn more about Health At Every Size® (HAES) or body positive movements.

Research and engage with communities/resources online or in person to learn more about how toxic diet culture is! Not only will this information help to challenge some of your own biases, it will also provide you with the necessary language and information to educate/share with others.

4. Set boundaries with others in regards to their language.

If you hear someone else making comments that are fatphobic or degrading about someone’s weight or size, speak up! You can always try to educate others about the Health At Every Size® (HAES) movement, or you can simply tell people that commenting on appearance isn’t appropriate and can lead to negative body image and disordered eating. You can also talk with a trusted friend, adult, family member, or therapist to strategize ways to set these boundaries. My personal favorite: reminding people that there are more interesting things to talk about than someone’s body, diet, exercise, etc.

5. Advocate for and work towards body acceptance.

This is a lifelong goal! So many people are affected by negative body image, chronic dieting, and eating disorders. Helping others realize that a lot of what we’ve been taught about weight and size is false can continue the growth of body positivity.

While no single person can change the world alone, there are plenty of likeminded individuals who see the harm that fatphobia does. Working on these small steps in your own life can begin to change your thought patterns, beliefs, and might even improve your own body image!